Iodine Liposomal Liquid Iodine 2 fl oz Vinco

Iodine Liposomal Liquid Iodine 2 fl oz Vinco
Item# 739930275478
$15.98

2 Fluid Ounces Supports healthy thyroid function in a liposomal delivery system which has been shown to increase efficacy, bioavailability, absorption, and delivery. Mint Flavored. Graduated markings on the dropper itself make it east to dispense a dosage ranging from 3.125mg to 12.5mg.

Supplement Facts: Serving Size: 1 Full Dropper (1 ml), Servings per Container: Approx. 60

Amount per Serving %DV

Iodine (Potassium Iodide, Kelp & Dulse Seaweed) 12.5 mg 8,333% * Daily Value (DV) not established DV is based on a 2,000 calorie diet Other Ingredients: Deionized Water, Glycerin, Phospholipids, MCT, Ascorbyl Palmitate, Flavor, Sodium Copper Chlorophyllin

Liposomal Liquid Iodine Item # V-LIQIOD 2 Fluid Ounces

Iodine, a non-metallic trace element, is required by humans for the synthesis of thyroid hormones, and is an essential trace element for life, the heaviest element commonly needed by living organisms, and the second heaviest known to be used by any form of life. Iodine deficiency is an important health problem throughout much of the world. Most of the earth's iodine is found in oceans, and iodine content in the soil varies with region. The older an exposed soil surface, the more likely the iodine has been leached away by erosion. Mountainous regions, such as the Himalayas, the Andes, and the Alps, and flooded river valleys, such as the Ganges, are among the most severely iodine-deficient areas in the world 1.

Mode of Action Iodine is an essential component of the thyroid hormones, triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4), and is therefore essential for normal thyroid function. To meet the body's demand for thyroid hormones, the thyroid gland traps iodine from the blood and incorporates it into thyroid hormones that are stored and released into the circulation when needed. In target tissues, such as the liver and the brain, T3, the physiologically active thyroid hormone, can bind to thyroid receptors in the nuclei of cells and regulate gene expression. In target tissues, T4, the most abundant circulating thyroid hormone, can be converted to T3 by selenium-containing enzymes known as deiodinases. In this manner, thyroid hormones regulate a number of physiologic processes, including growth, development, metabolism, and reproductive function 1, 2.

Iodine Deficiency In areas where there is little iodine in the diet,3 typically remote inland areas and semi-arid equatorial climates where no marine foods are eaten, iodine deficiency gives rise to hypothyroidism, symptoms of which are extreme fatigue, goiter, mental slowing, depression, weight gain, and low basal body temperatures.4 Iodine deficiency is the leading cause of preventable mental retardation, a result that occurs primarily when babies or small children are rendered hypothyroidic by a lack of the element. The addition of iodine to table salt has largely eliminated this problem in the wealthier nations, but, as of March 2006, iodine deficiency remained a serious public health problem in the developing world.5 Iodine deficiency is also a problem in certain areas of Europe.

Thyroid enlargement, or goiter, is one of the earliest and most visible signs of iodine deficiency. The thyroid enlarges in response to persistent stimulation by TSH. In mild iodine deficiency, this adaptative response may be enough to provide the body with sufficient thyroid hormone. However, more severe cases of iodine deficiency result in hypothyroidism. Adequate iodine intake will generally reduce the size of goiters, but the reversibility of the effects of hypothyroidism depends on an individual's stage of development. Iodine deficiency has adverse effects in all stages of development but is most damaging to the developing brain. In addition to regulating many aspects of growth and development, thyroid hormone is important for myelination of the central nervous system, which is most active before and shortly after birth 2, 6.

Radiation-Induced Health Concerns Radioactive iodine, especially 131I, may be released into the environment as a result of nuclear reactor accidents. Thyroid accumulation of radioactive iodine increases the risk of developing thyroid cancer, especially in children. The increased iodine trapping activity of the thyroid gland in iodine deficiency results in increased thyroid accumulation of radioactive iodine (131I). Thus, iodine-deficient individuals are at increased risk of developing radiation-induced thyroid cancer because they will accumulate greater amounts of radioactive iodine. Potassium iodide administered in pharmacologic doses (50-130 mg for adults) within 48 hours before or eight hours after radiation exposure from a nuclear reactor accident can significantly reduce thyroid uptake of 131I and decrease the risk of radiation-induced thyroid cancer 7.

Liposomal Delivery Liposomes, which use a form of nanotechnology science, also impressively and harmoniously, use the generalized nature of the Liposomes themselves to therefore increase the efficacy, bioavailability, absorption, and delivery of these certain entrapped dietary and nutritional supplements. This generalized nature and makeup of Liposomes, being composed of phospholipids, adroitly complements the natural lining of nearly every cell within the human body. This therefore creates a natural bond and or affinity for the Liposomes to deliver their onboard “payload” to the cells. The quality of raw Lipid used in the preparation and manufacturing of the Liposomes therefore precisely co-relates to this natural congruency between the Liposomes and the cells of the human body.

Vinco’s Liposomal Liquid Iodine

References 1. Hetzel BS, Clugston GA. Iodine. In: Shils M, Olson JA, Shike M, Ross AC, eds. Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease. 9th ed. Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins; 1999:253-264.

2. Dunn JT. What's happening to our iodine? J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1998;83(10):3398-3400.

3. Dissanayake, C. B.; Chandrajith, Rohana; Tobschall, H. J. (1999). "The iodine cycle in the tropical environment — implications on iodine deficiency disorders". International Journal of Environmental Studies 56: 357.

4. Felig, Philip; Frohman, Lawrence A. (2001). "Endemic Goiter". Endocrinology & metabolism. McGraw-Hill Professional.

5. Micronutrients - Iodine, Iron and Vitamin A". UNICEF. http://www.unicef.org/nutrition/index_iodine.html.

6. Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine. Iodine. Dietary reference intakes for vitamin A, vitamin K, boron, chromium, copper, iodine, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, silicon, vanadium, and zinc. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press; 2001:258-289.

7. Zanzonico PB, Becker DV. Effects of time of administration and dietary iodine levels on potassium iodide (KI) blockade of thyroid irradiation by 131I from radioactive fallout. Health Phys. 2000;78(6):660-667.